Cad-Re Feeds

281 Aspen, Soldotna, Alaska 99669
Hours 9:30-6 Mon.-Sat.

phone (907)262-4698 -- fax (907)262-6095
email:

PET NUTRITION

"Dog food makes a difference in your dog!!" Better quality food improves health and vitality, and saves waste. It is false economy to feed low quality food.

The Budget Friendly Guide to Caring For Your Pet


  • Saint Bernard Breeders

  • Local Newfoundland Dogs (and alpacas)
  • PARVO FAQ

  • Dog FAQ


  • SCOTTIE
    Grooming Instructions

    on the Stornoway Scots site.



  • Grief Support for the sad time when you lose a pet.


  • RAINBOW BRIDGE . . .Need a copy of the Rainbow Bridge poem? A Memorial? Stones, markers, wall plaques?
    Rainbow Bridge Pet Memorial Order Here






  • Dog Food
  • Orijen
  • Science Diet
  • Eagle Pack
  • Nutro/Natural Choice
  • Iams/Eukanuba
  • Canine Caviar

  • Farnam Pet Page


    Other Stuff:

    Bettas Info & Pictures


    Beginner Aquarium Set-Up
    • BLOAT- a life-threatening problem in large dogs. Get to a Veterinarian. Two issues need to be dealt with: gas and twist. If the twist has developed, you must get the dog to a vet instantly. Do Not Wait. If it is still in the gas phase, try Mylanta as suggested by the Saint Bernard email group to slow things down until you can get to the vet:
      Liquid >Mylanta Maximum Strengthfor a dog that you think is bloating. It has the highest % of Simethicone (40 mg per 5ml/tsp.). The Mylanta Maximum Strength also doubles as a great hot spot remedy. It beats trying to get pills down your dog's throat when the critical time arises. Also, it's much faster acting than pills. Saint Bernard people use about 50 cc's or more. At this point they're not too concerned about overdosing because of the severe consequences of bloat. Within a few minutes you'll hear your dog give off a big belch, which is a relief to both of you. Definitely carry some to dog shows. You'll never know when you'll need it. If you purchase it from a small store, make sure it's expiration date is ok. Meanwhile, get the dog to a vet.

    • YEAST INFECTIONS IN EARS----- The enzyme products (Oti-Cleanse, Zymox) and a product similar to the home-made Blue Lotion (Liquid Health Ear) are available to retail suppliers.

      For healthy ears and skin, consider corn free diets (also wheat/soybean free). Other options available are Probiotics and GSE (grapefruit seed extract) ear drops. Cad-Re also has several brands of ear cleaners available, such as Ark and Nolvasan Otic

    • The yeast problem needs to be resolved, but if the dog is scratching at ears or redness shows, there may be secondary infection (painful), and that is best treated by a veterinarian.
    • Ear Cleaner- Recipe to make yourself...... Blue Power
    • ..... new ....Gift Puppies
      Reasoning behind not selling puppies for Christmas (or birthdays for that matter).

      1. No one should ever buy a puppy for someone else to take care of. No puppy should be a surprise for the new owner. What if they don't want it after all? Or the timing is wrong for them? Or money is really tight? The person who is going to be the primary caretaker and trainer should be involved with the whole process with the breeder of obtaining a puppy from start to finish. It is an education process along the way, kind of like the engagement period. People can cry off at any time with no obligation if they learn that the dog would be too much for them to handle, for whatever reason.

      This especially includes kids. Young children should never be given sole responsibility for a dog because they are not capable: kids forget. What sort of lesson is it to a child to hear that if they don't take care of 'their' dog, the parent is going to "get rid of it" because the parent didn't really want a dog in the first place, but got it because they thought it would be good for the kid? It teaches the children that dogs are not important members of the family and that they are disposable goods. No one should aquire a dog without the intention to keep it for its full life. There are very few valid reasons to "get rid" of a dog.

      On the flip side, older children start driving and dating and usually go off to college where dogs are not allowed. And their social life doesn't usually have time for the emotional needs of a dog. Remember this is at least a ten year committment, and that cute ten year old kid will be twenty at least by the time the dog is old.

      So if a family gets a dog, it is always the parents dog. Also important to remember, financially, parents must always be responsible for the dog.

      2. Dogs are not objects, nor are they toys, to be discarded when we are tired of them. Giving a dog or a cat as a present puts them in the same category as other objects we receive. It does not stress the importance nor the reflection that should go into adding a member to the family. Unfortunately many people give more thought to the color of their new car then to the decision to add a dog to the family, much less what breed would be appropriate.

      3. Holidays and birthdays are usually very busy times, with lots of people coming and going. People are going to be too busy to put a puppy on a strict housetraining schedule and that does NOT bode well for the future. Bad habits are likely to be formed immediately and will be hard to break. Dogs that do not get housetrained often end up in Rescue or the shelter.

      4. It is not fair for the puppy to receive tons of attention from the kids that are home and the visiting relatives, and then, after the novelty and the holidays are gone, the puppy doesn't understand why nobody likes him anymore. Dogs are pack animals and Newfs in particular are people dogs. They want to be with their pack always, and seperating them from their family is likely to cause deep emotional distress in a young puppy esp after separating from his mom and littermates. Puppies should be brought home at a relatively calm period, when the new owners can have some free time to concentrate on them and just them. THEY should be the main event! Puppies thrive on routine and should be brought into the home when their new routine can be started from day one, so they can learn what to expect and what is expected of them.

      This is part of what I call Dog and Man' s social contract. We each have rights and responsibilites. Man brings dog into his home and asks (teaches) Dog to forego chewing and defecating in the house and digging and eating off the counter and other natural behaviors. Dog obliges and Man cares for him. In return for Man's care, Dog provides companionship and loyalty. It is Man's responsibility to adequately explain his rules (teaching). If the dog does not understand, it is our fault for not explaining it in a way they can understand. There are very few deal-breakers on the Dog's part, but one of them is biting people or being aggressive towards humans.

      5. Puppies should be brought home at an age that is right for them, not for a holdiay. Puppies benefit from human interaction prior to six weeks, but really up until that time are just learning to be dogs. From six weeks to about twelve on up to sixteen or so weeks, puppies are learning from Mom how to deal with peop le and their surroundings. Puppies are still benefiting from being around Mom and their littermates during this time, because there is a lot of social intereaction going on. Tackling new experiences from within the family and litter gives them confidence. Puppies who go home too early don't learn to 'speak dog' and have trouble with dog/dog interactions. Conversely, puppies need socialization to humans and the world as well, but as long as that is provided in the context of a home with mom and sibs, and with the breeder providing appropriate stimuli for new experiences, taking home an older puppy is not a problem and can be a benefit. My puppies go home between ten and 16 weeks old, after they have had their health checks.



    • NEW! Recipe for Picky Eaters
      Satin Balls:
      *Note: This requires a HUGE pot for mixing!

      1 doz. hard boiled eggs (chopped)
      10 lb. hamburger meat
      20 oz. jar of wheat germ
      1 canister of Knox Gelatin joint complex (unflavored)
      1 lg. box of Total breakfast cereal
      2 - 1 LB boxes of Quaker oatmeal (the kind you cook)
      1 1/2 cups canola oil
      12 oz. jar of unsulfered molasses
      1/4 tsp. salt
      1 heaping tsp. minced Garlic (jarred variety or fresh -- NOT dried)

      1 box of 1qt. Freezer bags

      Just dump all ingredients into a huge pot and dig in. It takes some effort -- and you will be up to your elbows -- but you want to mix thoroughly.
      Separate into 14 freezer bags -- gently squeezing out the air before sealing. Flatten out the bags (this will allow for a quicker thaw period), and lay flat on a freezer shelf.
      Feed one packet each day -- half in the morning -- half in the evening -- breaking up into chunks, or rolling into meatballs. Place one in the fridge each evening to thaw for the next day.
      You can try to mix kibble in when feeding -- but almost every dog has managed to suck off the good stuff and leave the kibble behind. I save the kibble for other meals. I haven't had a refusal yet -- not even the most finicky eater has passed up this concoction!
      Marge McGregor




    • Wheat-free Salmon Treats Recipe
      1- 8oz can salmon with juice, 1/2 cup chopped parsley, 3 eggs, shells included, 1/2 cup sesame seeds, ground up in coffee grinder, 1/2 cup flax seeds, ground up, 2-3 cups potato flour. Put these ingredients into a food processer, mix VERY WELL. Pour potato flour through the opening while the motor is still running. I can't tell you exactly how much, but I would guess about 2-3 cups. When the dough forms, like a pie crust, & rolls into a ball it is ready to take out. Dump this mess onto potato floured counter or board. Knead more flour into this & when it is a rolled out cookie consistancy, it is ready to roll out into about 1/4" thick. I use a pizza cutter to roll out long strips, then cut crosswise to make small squares. Bake on cookie sheets, sprayed with Pam or line with parchement paper in oven 375 for 20 minutes. Turn & rotate the cookie sheets & bake about 10 minutes more. You can make them as soft or hard as you like. ****From Nora Salter.


    • Other recipes you can make
      (thanks to the Saint Bernard email list, namely Brenda of Twin Branch Saints).
      
        CHEESE PASTRIES FOR DOGS / CATS
      
          a.. 6 Tablespoons fat (oil, margarine, for example)
          b.. 1 cup all purpose flour
          c.. 1/2 Cup finely grated cheddar cheese
          d.. 1 small garlic clove, mashed or minced
        Blend fat and cheese until smooth. Stir in garlic, then mix in flour.
      Mixture will be crumbly. Roll mixture into shape of a log and chill until
      firm. Cut slices from roll and place on ungreased cookie sheet. Bake at 375
      degrees until slightly brown, about 10 minutes.
      
      
      
        PET COOKIES
      
          a.. 1 jar strained baby meat
          b.. 6 heaping tablespoons wheat germ
          c.. 4 heaping tablespoons powdered milk
        Form 5-6 balls and press on greased cookies sheet. Bake 10-15 minutes in
      oven at 350 degrees.
      
      
        CRUNCHY MUNCHIES (Cats / Dogs)
      
          a.. 1 Cup brown rice
          b.. 2 cups beef,chicken or fish broth  (choose the flavor your critter
      prefers)
          c.. 2-3 tablespoons oil
        Bring broth to a boil. Stir in rice; bring back toboil and simmer stirring
      occasionally about 40 minutes.  all broth should be absorbed by rice.
      
        Spread cooked rice on a cookie sheet. Bake at 400 degrees until rice is
      brown and crackly, about 20 minutes (or allow to dry at room temperature for
      about 24 hours). Heat 2-3 tablespoons of oil in frying pan.  Add rice about
      1/2 cup at a time and shake until rice puffs up. Drain puffs on paper towel.
      Serve, or store in airtight container.
      
       Saints4ever,
      
      Brenda-Twin Branch Saints
      
       



    VETERINARY LIBRARY

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    MUSHING & SKIJORING

      Mush, You Huskies!
      The PSDRA, Peninsula Sled Dog and Racing Association Joins with the Skijoring Club to
    • promote family sledding activities and
    • training.
    • For dates and times on Fun Runs and Clinics and Play Days, contact Mitch Michaud at 262-4977, or mitchm[at]gci.net

    "There's facts about dogs...and there's opinions about them. The dogs have the facts, and the humans have the opinions. If you want facts about a dog, always get them straight from the dog."

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